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From the 5/6 grade classroom

posted Jan 17, 2014, 12:26 PM by Diane Randall

I HAVE A DREAM

by

Rena Taylor, Moriah Lucia, Livia Bernhardt, and Morgan LaPorte

 

“I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident; that all men are created equal,” are famous words spoken by Martin Luther King Jr.  During the time of the Civil Rights Movement, there were a lot of people being judged just because they were different. Dr. King wanted to end these injustices in a nonviolent way. He started peaceful protests to help people gain their human rights.  Our class is using Martin Luther King’s example to try to stop bullying in our classroom, school, and other schools .

 

“ I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character,” said Martin Luther King. For this is what many African Americans hoped. Life was very unfair during the time of the Civil Rights Movement. African Americans were not treated the same way as white people. They had to sit in the back of the bus, they couldn’t drink out of the same water  fountain, and they had to go to separate schools. If a black person was hurt or injured, they weren’t treated with the same health care.  African Americans had very little rights or they didn’t have any rights at all.

 “I have a dream that one day in Alabama, little black boys and little black girls will join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers,” said Martin Luther King Jr.  in 1963. Dr. King wanted people to stop treating others differently just because of their skin color. Martin Luther King influenced other African Americans to peacefully and nonviolently stand up for their human rights. One of the people he influenced was a woman named Rosa Parks. She was going home after work one day and wanted to ride the bus. She took a seat in the front, but had to move to the back because of her skin color. Rosa refused to move her seat because she felt she deserved to be treated equally.     

 Since she did not move her seat, she was arrested. Many other people also started living out Dr. King’s message.  Some African Americans would go into “White Only” restaurants and sit down peacefully and silently to make a point that they should be able to eat where they want.  Martin Luther King said, “Love is the key to problems of the world.”  He wanted love to end segregation and discrimination. On August 28, 1963,  two hundred and fifty thousand people came to Washington D.C. to peacefully march from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial. At the Lincoln Memorial, Dr. King gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. This speech spoke of equality and justice for everyone. Even if someone had a different race, gender, religion, or ability level, Martin wanted people to be treated with respect.


            “Sooner or later all the people in the world will have to discover a way to live together,” proclaimed Martin Luther King Jr. That is what Martin Luther King Jr. wanted to happen throughout the world.  Dr. King wanted everyone to get along. Even though people have more rights today, we still have many more miles to march. In schools, there is a lot of bullying going on. Our class and school is trying to stop bullying. For an All School Meeting, we are putting together a slideshow and performance explaining why we should stop bullying and promote positive relationships.  We are trying to encourage people to stand up and speak out against bullying. When we witness bullying, we witness someone becoming a victim. We want to believe in a better way.  NO bullies, NO victims, and ALL peacemakers!


      Martin Luther King was a man who influenced our society in a positive way. He changed  people’s lives and peacefully fought for everyone to be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Today, we are still trying to live out his dream and value people for who they are.

 

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